Mentacle Ink

Ask me anything   Comics, art, and comics-related art by Tintin Pantoja

ianjq:

steven expressions, episodes 1-10

SU is never going to be a show that adheres to static, lifeless stock expressions. it’s a CARTOON and we do not apologize.

Expression reference

(via fuckyeahanimation)

— 3 days ago with 7788 notes

drawnblog:


“What else do we notice […]?  Two-tier storytelling.  Isn’t it strange how all three teams have gone to two-tier, independent of each other?
Maybe not.  You’ve cut the print page in half.  If you want each screen to make sense as a discrete entity, you have to respect the cut.  If you want each screen to contain enough information to make it worth reading, you need a strategy to maximise your panelling.  And if you want to be able to stretch out and get a big picture in there while still maintaining storytelling coherency, you’ve kind of got to go wide on the page.”

—Warren Ellis, from a fascinating post on formatting comics for reading in multiple formats, especially tablet, phone, web interface, and of course good old print. Ideas of modularity in comics composition make a lot of sense, when you consider the nested way they’re built fundamentally, in terms of discrete objects: images > panels > pages and on up.
Ellis touches on some recent comics designed for multiple platforms, including Mark Waid and Peter Krause’s new Insufferable, which has gotten some attention for being Waid’s big public splash into making webcomics. While I’m generally suspcious of Big Public Splashes, especially from old media into new media, new thinking is always a good thing. I’m especially interested in Warren Ellis’s ideas on format, as he’s been an early adopter of new formats for years and has a pretty clear-eyed thinking when it comes to what is possible and what should be possible in a given format. 

drawnblog:

What else do we notice […]?  Two-tier storytelling.  Isn’t it strange how all three teams have gone to two-tier, independent of each other?

Maybe not.  You’ve cut the print page in half.  If you want each screen to make sense as a discrete entity, you have to respect the cut.  If you want each screen to contain enough information to make it worth reading, you need a strategy to maximise your panelling.  And if you want to be able to stretch out and get a big picture in there while still maintaining storytelling coherency, you’ve kind of got to go wide on the page.”

Warren Ellis, from a fascinating post on formatting comics for reading in multiple formats, especially tablet, phone, web interface, and of course good old print. Ideas of modularity in comics composition make a lot of sense, when you consider the nested way they’re built fundamentally, in terms of discrete objects: images > panels > pages and on up.

Ellis touches on some recent comics designed for multiple platforms, including Mark Waid and Peter Krause’s new Insufferable, which has gotten some attention for being Waid’s big public splash into making webcomics. While I’m generally suspcious of Big Public Splashes, especially from old media into new media, new thinking is always a good thing. I’m especially interested in Warren Ellis’s ideas on format, as he’s been an early adopter of new formats for years and has a pretty clear-eyed thinking when it comes to what is possible and what should be possible in a given format. 

— 4 days ago with 116 notes

tally-art:

Last year, Jamie S. Rich and I developed a series of blog posts to accompany A Boy & A Girl (Oni Press was planning to release it chapter-by-chapter online before the release of the GN).  The posts weren’t used in the end, but I’d like to release this blog post (meant to follow chapter 2) and possibly one other because they discuss staging for comics.  Specifically, how to handle a scene where the 180 degree rule and characters’ order of dialogue conflict.
Note: I know a lot of comic artists who feel that the 180 degree rule is more important in film than comics, and don’t let it dictate how they stage their comics.  I think it’s a useful guideline and don’t break it unless I can’t avoid doing so.

— 4 days ago with 1109 notes

ungoliantschilde:

Stan Lee and John Buscema’s “How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way” might be one of, if not the number 1 most mentioned book by artists that I have met at conventions. Art is kinda like music. You can be as creative as you want, provided that you know the chords to play and how to play them well. Learn the basics, and elaborate from there.
And remember: Picasso did not start his career painting in the cubist style. He did portraits, landscapes, sketches, he did his now-famous “Blue Period” of paintings, and THEN he did his cubist paintings. You have to know the why and the how before you turn the art world upside down. In any art form, any medium, any venue, or anything creative.

— 4 days ago with 1995 notes

Upcoming Classes →

comicschoolmanila:

If you’re interested in learning how to draw, make comics (or you know someone who is), or write scripts for comics, you might want to refer them to our latest class sessions. We’ve got three different classes*:

KIDS APRIL MAY 2014KIDS JUNE TO AUGUSTBEGINNER JUNE TO AUGUSTADVANCED JUNE TO AUGUST

*While we initially planned to offer lessons…

— 4 days ago with 4 notes

Summer Komikon 2014 →

comicschoolmanila:

Behold, the Komikon booth last April 12 at the Bayanihan Center in Pasig! Can you tell I like red? It was so nice to meet many new people and pick up some truly fantastic books. Many emails will be sent today regarding upcoming class schedules. Thank you, everyone!

Congrats also to MiKOMIKON 2014 BOOTHkey…

— 5 days ago with 2 notes

#komikon  #komiks  #comicschoolmanila 
grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - FeetI don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Feet

I don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.

Norm

(via vsatone)

— 5 days ago with 11391 notes

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!

Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.

This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).

Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

(via potatofarmgirl)

— 6 days ago with 21231 notes

Should Superheroes Be Paragons, Or Renegades? →

m-v-b:

*Contains Marvel Movie Spoilers*

There has been much ado about what makes a good superhero lately with some people claiming that characters like Captain America aren’t interesting unless they’re portrayed as jerks (see; Ultimates) and others claiming that the wholesome Captain America (as…

— 1 week ago with 22 notes