Not so happy with the Alunsina Kislap refill + broad fountain pen

8bitmaximo:

leseanthomas:

OMFG. THIS. SHOW.

GPOY FOREVER.

image

Panels are useful, so useful that we start to believe that they’re an essential element of comicking, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Panels are merely a means to an end, a straightforward way of conveying a visual narrative; they enforce a clear sequence of images with dividing…

kismetcity:

Kismet: Sun-Cutter relaunches in just 2 weeks - Monday, September 1!

Kismet is a space opera webcomic I’ve been working on since 2002. Right now there are about 500 pages of it, spread over one complete graphic novel and a number of side comics.

So where do you start…

Go to Layla!

dianasprinkle:

spookychan:

comics:

The Glorious Gutter Life

003 - How Not to Take It in the Tailpipe (or, Comic Contracts 101)

Last week on The Glorious Gutter Life: 002 - Pitching and Moaning

Congratulations. You’ve just sold your first creator owned…

redinkradio:

I’ve spent a lot of time recently thinking about my life before The Center for Cartoon Studies, or, more accurately—my state of mind. Before I moved to White River Junction, Vermont in the summer of 2011 I was living in NYC struggling to make ends meet and publishing my webcomic Darwin…

spookychan:

comics:

The Glorious Gutter Life

003 - How Not to Take It in the Tailpipe (or, Comic Contracts 101)

Last week on The Glorious Gutter Life: 002 - Pitching and Moaning

Congratulations. You’ve just sold your first creator owned comic book to a publisher,

victoriaying:

A week ago, I was privileged enough to attend a conference by the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. One of the keynote speakers was Judy Schachner, author of many character driven books including “Skippyjon Jones.” She talked about her process of thinking…

Anonymous said: How do I make a reader care about a character very quickly?

thewritingcafe:

Take away something at the beginning. I saw a comic on Tumblr a long time ago about a woman who discovered she wasn’t real. The comic was short and it was just her inner thoughts. Just a few panels of her inner thoughts were able to make the reader sympathetic because something so integral to her was taken away and now her identity is shattered while everyone around her has something that she doesn’t. Do that to your character. Take something away from them that makes the reader feel bad for them.

It can be difficult to do this with everyday situations unless you show what it was like before that something was taken away. You can show your character in “the everyday world” at the beginning of the story and the inciting incident can happen right away. A common theme that makes readers care for a character is loneliness.

Give them something at the beginning. Or you can do the opposite. Show your character in a situation that makes the reader pity them and then fix it in a way that makes the reader feel happy for them. Again, a common theme for these situations is loneliness. The lonely rejected kid on the playground who is approached by another reject kid is a familiar scene that achieves this.

Introduce an antagonist. If you introduce an antagonist that the reader ends up hating right away, they’ll be more inclined to side with the protagonist.

Make them relatable. It’s quite difficult to make a character that almost anyone can relate to, but you can make a character a good chunk of people relate to from the very beginning. Think about the age of your character and relatable problems that surround that age. For example, identity, individuality, and relationships are important to teenagers. Introducing a character dealing with one of those issues from the very beginning can draw readers within that age group into the story.

Torture your character. Put them in a physically and/or emotionally painful situation at the beginning of the story. The trick is to make the scene honest and genuine enough that the reader wants this character to come out victorious. 

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